Seeking treatment for an eating disorder is a crucial turning point for people who may have only recently realized that their behaviors are, in fact, an eating disorder. They may also just be learning that treatment can lead to long-term recovery from anorexia, bulimia or other eating disorders.

Seeking treatment for an eating disorder is a crucial turning point for people who may have only recently realized that their behaviors are, in fact, an eating disorder. They may also just be learning that treatment can lead to long-term recovery from anorexia, bulimia or other eating disorders. Many times people who have eating disorders may believe that their eating disorder is a way for them to gain control over themselves and their lives. They have become increasingly focused on being thin. This may be due to a distorted body image which could be a result of their negative views of their body, and their selves. People with eating disorders don’t always recognize their symptoms as problematic, but their family and friends have noticed a change in their behavior or appearance. Eating disorders are frequently found to be alongside other mental health issues, including depression, anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder. This makes an accurate diagnosis even more important in the successful outcome of eating disorder treatment.

Acceptance of the problem

One of the most important signs that an individual may be ready to begin treatment for their eating disorder is an acceptance of the problem. This may be challenging because many people with eating disorders find it hard to recognize their symptoms. They may have panic, anxiety, or lack of concentration which could lead to other things such as abuse of substances or even suicidal thoughts. Left unaddressed, feelings of discomfort sometimes lead patients to “drop-out” of treatment. This is not uncommon in patients with anorexia nervosa, who are at the highest risk for medical issues or death. Although people with binge-eating disorder or bulimia nervosa are not quite as commonly plagued with this difficulty in acceptance, this phase is generally considered the foundation of recovery. Unless a person with an eating disorder recognizes the problems that are caused by their eating disorder and are able to address their thought process and/or body image, their therapists are unable to provide truly life-changing treatment.

Treatment programming methods

Eating disorder treatment programs have several variations and styles. By definition the word “programming” means “A set of methods and techniques that work with the non-conscious parts of the brain to re-pattern the thoughts, behaviors and beliefs that are limiting an individual.” There are many different methods which are regarded as successful, including cognitive-behavioral therapy, dialectical behavioral therapy, and family therapy. Some treatment programs may recommend the Maudsley Approach, a family-based treatment method. These treatment programs may work for some people, but may not work for others.

Learning about eating disorder treatment methods

Some treatment methods are not 100% accepted in the field of eating disorder treatment. The benefits and risks of any treatment program should be understood before beginning. Most behavioral specialists and psychologists have a good understanding of many of the eating disorder treatment methods and which are appropriate for patients who are struggling with specific problems. In order to which treatment is most effective for individuals, it is important for the therapist to establish rapport with the patient and their family. This also contributes to the willingness of the patient to participate in the therapy itself. Eating disorder treatment teams who are able to connect with their patients can help break down the walls of defense often built up by past confrontations. They can pave the way for members of the patient’s friend circles and/or family to provide ongoing support.

Recovery from eating disorders

If patients respond well to the method of treatment, they have generally gained weight and are beginning to better understand their body image. These factors are important measurements of treatment success and contribute to a better long-term recovery rate. Patients also need to be able to trust themselves and learn how to listen to their body and their feelings. They discover that the human body is amazing in its ability to tell us not only that something is wrong, but also hint at solutions. Patients who are well on the road to recovery will also learn to accept themselves for who they are and understand that their needs are important too. They see their value as a person and recognize that they have something to offer to others. Learning and embracing these types of changes in one’s habits and behaviors is truly only a small part of recovery. The understanding that this change has to be permanent can allow habits to be re-learned, which is ultimately a part of every success story.

Resources:
Rudy McCormick is the author of this article on Bulimia.
Find more information on Treatment of Bulimia here.


Sponsored Links

Author:

This author has published 1 articles so far. More info about the author is coming soon.